Free Gift Cards Update

Welcome to 2015! It’s been quite a year. Thanks to you and your remarks in the Facebook comment enabled section below every post and page your site Free Gift Cards got the popularity and exposure it deserves. I am working on adding new useful content to help you identify scams vs. legit gift card offers.

Seems like scammers don’t give up, yet I don’t understand how would anyone fall for their tricks.

If you receive an email that says something about your free Visa gift card (or Walmart, Amazon, Bestbuy … etc) is about to expire and there is a link that you should click in order to claim it, and you don’t recall anything about this free gift card, the best thing to do is to ignore this message.

But just in case it is legit, check where the email is sent from. If the email is something like johnsmith@visa.com or @rewards.visa.com then there is a chance it is something you forgot about. Report the message to Visa.com immediately if you don’t see their domain name (visa.com) in the email address because this is a scammer trying to “phish” for your sensitive information.

If it passes the first check then examine the link without clicking it. You can do that by hovering the mouse cursor over the link and your browser will show you the actual link. If it has visa.com domain name in it then there is a chance it is legit. If not then there is a chance (not for sure) that it is a scam. To confirm it right-click the link and copy it to another browser that you are not using a lot. I use Chrome and Firefox, so I would check it in an Internet Explorer or Opera browser. If it starts with a just anything and ends up with a visa.com page then it’s just a tracking software and it is likely to be legit. If you never end up on a visa.com page it means it is not from Visa and is more likely a “phishing” attempt. Again report it to Visa.

Now please keep in mind that over 99% of the gift card offers you will see are not from the company they are offered from. Let me rephrase with an example. If you give me a Visa gift card on my birth day, the gift card is from visa but I got it from you. It is still legit, right?

The same is done by some legit marketing companies. They use their gift cards giveaway to build a database of potential customers in certain markets. I explained this like a 100 times on this website, but here it is one more time, and let’s stick to the Visa gift card example:

If you respond to the Visa gift card offer it means you are interested in Visa as a brand. If in order to qualify you responded to a Garcinia campogia extract free trial offer it means you are trying to lose weight. So after you finish the qualifying process before you get to claim the card you can expect to receive emails from the marketer behind the offer trying to interest you in more weight loss products/memberships.

Those are legit marketing companies. And if you pay attention they never mention the word “FREE” in their advertising or on their websites. Actually some of them have a problem with the word FREE in the domain name of this website and are not allowing their ads on it!